Tag Archives: Hoya 77mm HD Circular Polarizer

Ottawa Nature Photographer | Transit of Venus 2012

Transit of Venus, 2012, as seen from Ottawa, Ontario

This “once in a lifetime” photo was taken at 19:05:54 on June 5, 2012 in Ottawa, Ontario. In attendance was my good friend and fellow photographer, Fernando Matias. Working together, we combined our camera gear by stacking our Canon EF 70-200mm IS lenses with 2 polarizers and 2 EF Extenders 2xII to effectively create a 800mm lens. We took this picture at 1/8000 of a second using an aperture value of 64 and an ISO rating of 50 – In other words, we did as much as we could to get in as close as we could while reducing the intensity of the light. What a moment! The bright dot is the sun, and the tiny black dot is Venus. Photography safety tip #1: Protect your eyes by remembering to never look directly at the sun!

Ottawa Travel Photographer | A hot air balloon and the sun rises over Göreme, Turkey

Hot air balloon silhouette, Göreme, Turkey

Early one morning I decided to run a few clicks and climb some fairy chimneys to watch the sun rise over Göreme, Turkey. To my great surprise both the sun and a hot air balloon rose before my eyes, which altogether was a really nice moment to experience and perform one of my favorite photography effects – silhouette photography.

Ottawa Travel Photographer | Hot air balloon ride over Göreme, Turkey

Hot air balloon ride, Göreme, Turkey

Celebrating my birthday with an early morning hot air balloon ride – my very first one – over the snowcapped landscape and fairy chimneys of Göreme, Turkey

Ottawa Nature Photographer | Digitalis, Foxgloves

Flower Photography by Jeffrey Meyer – Digitalis, Foxgloves

Ottawa Photographer | Canada Day with Their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge

Ottawa Photographer, Canada Day with the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge

What a beautiful day of sunshine and celebration! From this vantage point we see thousands of Canadians – proudly clad in red and white – joining Canadian dignitaries in welcoming Their Royal Highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (centre stage), on Parliament Hill to enjoy among other artists, a Happy Canada Day performance by Great Big Sea (left stage)– a Canadian Folk-Rock band. Also featured in this big picture perspective are hundreds of media representatives from around the world (right platform) all looking to photograph, film and interview the honourable main attraction here: William and Kate — Two nice people who will very likely become the most photographed couple in modern times, and maybe even ever!

Ottawa Event and Portrait Photographer | Carivibe Parade

Ottawa Event Photographer, Carivibe Parade

2011 Carivibe party scene parading feathers, culture and music up St Joseph Boulevard in Orleans, Ontario.

Ottawa Wedding Photographer | Corn Field Backdrop

Wedding Photography in a Corn Field

Celebrating Christine and Terry’s Big Day with some photography fun in the sun, and a corn field – talk about POP Corn!

Ottawa Nature and Travel Photographer | Arctic Canada, Sleeping Polar Bear

Arctic Canada, Polar Bear Sleeping

Jeff to self: Mmmm, I wonder if now would be a good time to pet the bear?

Ottawa Nature and Travel Photographer | High Park Hillside Gardens in Toronto, Ontario

Ottawa Photographer, High Park Hillside Gardens

Even in Canada’s largest and most commercial metropolis, there is space to enjoy park nature and life.

Ottawa Nature Photographer | Sparrow, Gearing up for Flight

Ottawa Photographer, Sparrow

Polar Bear Family | Arctic Canada Photography

Polar Bear Family off the coastline of Nunavut, Canada

Polar Bear Family off the coastline of Nunavut, Canada

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Canadian Polar Bear Family-1002

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Canadian Polar Bear Family-1001

Encountering this polar bear family with my camera in hand was a totally amazing moment, and one that I’m sure will be hard to replicate again! After this experience, I don’t think I’ll be able to read the “three little bears” quite the same way ever again either…LOL

So, I know you’re bursting at the seams to ask: “How close were you”…Well, after giving the question some deep thought, I’ll simply say: I was close enough…LOL And quickly confess that it really doesn’t get any better than this. From a technical standpoint, capturing these guys in the RAW was very difficult, as I took these photos from a zodiac bobbing up and down in choppy water. But, with a fast enough camera shutter speed (1/1600ths of a second) I was able to capture the show. I used my Canon 70-200 with an extender, and shot just about all my pictures at 400mm. It was tough trying to time everything with the movement of the waves (pushing my camera shutter down as the wave brought us down), but I’m very happy with the result. The really neat thing here, though, is that these bears wanted to see us just as much as we wanted to see them. So, we both pushed our comfort zones for the sake of curiosity, and that’s the neatest thing of all!

Ottawa Nature and Travel Photographer | An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

During my Cruise North expedition in Canada’s arctic waters I came across some incredibly massive icebergs that towered high above the waterline (and what we see above the waterline is only a fraction of their actual size!). The iceberg featured here was just “floating around” in Strathcona Sound, Nunavut. On this sunny day of September 8th, 2010, my brother and I (along with the rest of the passengers aboard the Lyubov Orlova) had the great privilege to jump in some zodiacs and tour around this iceberg. It was a beautiful moment, and something we had quite a bit of time to enjoy on account our cruise ship was ‘docked’ at Nanisivik to refuel before finishing the last leg of the voyage, and heading home.

My pictures here make it hard to establish a sense of scale, but if you look for the zodiac carriers that we used to navigate around you can begin to appreciate the human scale. In some cases, I could barely fit everything I was seeing with my 16mm camera lens in hand! An all-out WOW moment, but if that was not enough, we soon saw a seal bobbing its head up-and-down in the water, and as we tried to approach it with civility, another spectacular moment of chance caught our already heighted attention- a lone male polar bear relaxing on the shoreline.

Ottawa Nature Photographer | Canadian Tulip Festival, Tulip(ic) of the day

Canadian Tulip Festival

An “Akebono” tulipa leaning over to share a drop of water with his neighbour from his pedal…

Ottawa Nature Photographer | Canadian Tulip Festival, Tulip(ic) of the day

Canadian Tulip Festival

Two “White Swallow” tulipas side-by-side: clean, fresh, simple and sharp.

Ottawa Nature Photographer | Canadian Tulip Festival, Tulip(ic) of the day

Canadian Tulip Festival

Blushing Apeldoorn” tulipas rushing the field in full force; what a sight and scent at Commissioners Park! WoW!

Ottawa Nature Photographer | Canadian Tulip Festival, Tulip(ic) of the day

Canadian Tulip Festival

Red Tulip: Excuse me miss, if you don’t mind me saying, you’re a very pretty tulip!
Pink Tulip: Oh, hehe, you’ve just made me blush…
Red Tulip: What’s your name?
Pink Tulip: Me, my name is Foxtrot, Foxtrot Tulipa
Red Tulip: I like your name, perhaps we could go dancing this weekend at the Canadian Tulip Festival. I hear they’re going to have a lot of tulips dancing at the show!
Foxtrot: That sounds really nice. I’d love to go…

Ottawa Nature Photographer | Canadian Tulip Festival, Wild Hyacinth

Wild Hyacinth at the Canadian Tulip Festival

There’s more to see than tulips at the Canadian Tulip Festival, so don’t be shy to show your love and affection to those working the gates: like this wild hyacinth for example.

Ottawa Nature Photographer | Canadian Tulip Festival, Tulip(ic) of the day

Canadian Tulip Festival

An explosion of colour from atop the “Mount Tacoma” tulipa

Ottawa Nature Photographer | Canadian Tulip Festival, Tulip(ic) of the day

Canadian Tulip Festival

Extreme beauty has this “Apeldoorn’s Elite” tulipa living on the fringe

Ottawa Nature Photographer | Canadian Tulip Festival, Tulip(ic) of the day

Canadian Tulip Festival

Being an early bloomer can be tough and lonely work, but this brave “Mariette” tulipa is standing on guard for thee…

Ottawa Nature Photographer | Canadian Tulip Festival, Tulip(ic) of the day

Canadian Tulip Festival

Sound the trumpets, and make way for today’s pic from the Canadian Tulip Festival: All hail the “Red Emperor” tulipa in full force!

Ottawa Photographer |Ottawa River, White Water Kayaking

Kayaker in the Ottawa River

Enjoying an incredibly beautiful Sunday afternoon with some ultra-amazing white water kayakers on the Ottawa River.
At times I was clocking in camera shutter speeds up to 1/8000ths of a second…what a rush for me, and I’m sure for them in the cold April water!

Look at that | Silhouette Photography

Lock at that...

Lock at that…

Lock at that...

Lock at that…

I really like using silhouettes in my work and Powerpoint presentations because I think they can very quickly convey powerful ideas in a relatively neutral and unambiguous manner. I call this silhouette series “Look”

There are several ways you can create silhouettes in your photography. One way is photo editing – Adobe Photoshop ($) and Gimp (free) are two powerful programs available on the market that can help you ‘select’ the areas you wish to silhouette, or darken. With a few simple clicks of your mouse and some technical knowhow, silhouettes can be easily created for any photo after the fact. Yet, it’s also possible to create silhouettes straight out of your camera. One way to accomplish this is to position your subject in such a way that the foreground is much darker than the background. Shooting directly into the sun without any camera flash for foreground light is perhaps the easiest way to create an almost automatic silhouette, but it’s also very possible to do it with the sun off to the side, and some knowhow around camera settings (higher shutter speeds, smaller aperatures, low ISO). In any case the rule of thumb is simple; keep your foreground dark and your background bright. In this case, I used both my camera and software editing to really exaggerate the blackness of my silhouette. This photo was taken in Northern Nunavut and features my brother.

File Speed: ISO 100
Aperture: ƒ/6.3 (with polarizer)
Focal length: 70 mm
Shutter Speed: 1/320th of a second
Filter: Hoya HD Circular Polarizer, 77mm

Ottawa Photographer | Nathan Phillips Square in the Winter, Zamboni

Nathan Phillips Square in the Winter, Zamboni and Ice Rink

Nathan Phillips Square during the winter in Toronto, Ontario. Outdoor skating rink with a zamboni and City Hall in the background.

Ottawa Photographer | From Berry Awesome to Berry Blue

Nothing beats eating a big bowl of berries on a Sunday morning, or even better, photographing them before munching down on a few. Nearing the end of fall, and with a 10:00 sun streaking through the clouds to light these guys up, I just couldn’t resist taking a few pictures. But, these berry awesome shots turned out berry bad because somewhere along the way I lost the digital originals while playing with special effects. So, this is just a short post to say: Be berry wise! Back-up your files, or risk becoming a blue berry! ;(