Tag Archives: Icebergs

Ottawa Nature and Travel Photographer | An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

During my Cruise North expedition in Canada’s arctic waters I came across some incredibly massive icebergs that towered high above the waterline (and what we see above the waterline is only a fraction of their actual size!). The iceberg featured here was just “floating around” in Strathcona Sound, Nunavut. On this sunny day of September 8th, 2010, my brother and I (along with the rest of the passengers aboard the Lyubov Orlova) had the great privilege to jump in some zodiacs and tour around this iceberg. It was a beautiful moment, and something we had quite a bit of time to enjoy on account our cruise ship was ‘docked’ at Nanisivik to refuel before finishing the last leg of the voyage, and heading home.

My pictures here make it hard to establish a sense of scale, but if you look for the zodiac carriers that we used to navigate around you can begin to appreciate the human scale. In some cases, I could barely fit everything I was seeing with my 16mm camera lens in hand! An all-out WOW moment, but if that was not enough, we soon saw a seal bobbing its head up-and-down in the water, and as we tried to approach it with civility, another spectacular moment of chance caught our already heighted attention- a lone male polar bear relaxing on the shoreline.

Ottawa Travel Photographer | Icebergs, ice cubes, and ice-ice baby!!!

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Icebergs-9

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Icebergs-8

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Icebergs-7

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Icebergs-6

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Icebergs-5

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Icebergs-4

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Icebergs-3

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Icebergs-2

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Icebergs
Last night I topped my hamburger with some iceberg lettuce, and began thinking about the spectacular icebergs I saw floating around (some for hundreds of years) in the High Arctic. Like ice cubes floating in a clear glass of water, the ice I could see topping over the waterline during my travels was just a fraction of its overall size, as the bulk of an ice cube’s mass floating in a liquid is submerged.

I’ve always held this mental image that Canada’s northern waters were littered with jagged ice cubes floating all over the place, but that didn’t appear to be the case where (and when) my expedition travelled. I suppose that makes sense, because if it was really like that then that wouldn’t make for smooth travels. Yet, the cubes I did see were all out massive, and after giving it some serious thought, I cannot understand how the Titanic could have missed something like that. But, more than ever, I now appreciate how an iceberg could have sunk the Titanic. Titanic is a big word, but the colossal is even bigger, and these cubes were colossal in my esteem.