Tag Archives: Nunavut Photography

Ottawa Nature and Travel Photographer | Arctic Canada, Sleeping Polar Bear

Arctic Canada, Polar Bear Sleeping

Jeff to self: Mmmm, I wonder if now would be a good time to pet the bear?

Ottawa Nature and Travel Photographer | Arctic Canada, A Polar Bear Walking on a Barren Land

Arctic Canada, Polar Bear Walking on a Barren Land


Life finds a way,…

Polar Bears | Arctic Canada Photography

Arctic Canada, Polar bear on a rocky cliff

Arctic Canada, Polar bear on a rocky cliff

Arctic Canada, Polar bear on a rocky cliff

Arctic Canada, Polar bear on a rocky cliff

Arctic Canada, Polar bear on a rocky cliff

Arctic Canada, Polar bear on a rocky cliff

Arctic Canada, Polar bear on a rocky cliff

Strong, agile, and so cute you just want to pet them behind the ears – but not advisable.

Polar Bear Family | Arctic Canada Photography

Polar Bear Family off the coastline of Nunavut, Canada

Polar Bear Family off the coastline of Nunavut, Canada

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Canadian Polar Bear Family-1002

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Canadian Polar Bear Family-1001

Encountering this polar bear family with my camera in hand was a totally amazing moment, and one that I’m sure will be hard to replicate again! After this experience, I don’t think I’ll be able to read the “three little bears” quite the same way ever again either…LOL

So, I know you’re bursting at the seams to ask: “How close were you”…Well, after giving the question some deep thought, I’ll simply say: I was close enough…LOL And quickly confess that it really doesn’t get any better than this. From a technical standpoint, capturing these guys in the RAW was very difficult, as I took these photos from a zodiac bobbing up and down in choppy water. But, with a fast enough camera shutter speed (1/1600ths of a second) I was able to capture the show. I used my Canon 70-200 with an extender, and shot just about all my pictures at 400mm. It was tough trying to time everything with the movement of the waves (pushing my camera shutter down as the wave brought us down), but I’m very happy with the result. The really neat thing here, though, is that these bears wanted to see us just as much as we wanted to see them. So, we both pushed our comfort zones for the sake of curiosity, and that’s the neatest thing of all!

Ottawa Nature and Travel Photographer | An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

An iceberg in Strathcona Sound, Nanisivik, Nunuavut

During my Cruise North expedition in Canada’s arctic waters I came across some incredibly massive icebergs that towered high above the waterline (and what we see above the waterline is only a fraction of their actual size!). The iceberg featured here was just “floating around” in Strathcona Sound, Nunavut. On this sunny day of September 8th, 2010, my brother and I (along with the rest of the passengers aboard the Lyubov Orlova) had the great privilege to jump in some zodiacs and tour around this iceberg. It was a beautiful moment, and something we had quite a bit of time to enjoy on account our cruise ship was ‘docked’ at Nanisivik to refuel before finishing the last leg of the voyage, and heading home.

My pictures here make it hard to establish a sense of scale, but if you look for the zodiac carriers that we used to navigate around you can begin to appreciate the human scale. In some cases, I could barely fit everything I was seeing with my 16mm camera lens in hand! An all-out WOW moment, but if that was not enough, we soon saw a seal bobbing its head up-and-down in the water, and as we tried to approach it with civility, another spectacular moment of chance caught our already heighted attention- a lone male polar bear relaxing on the shoreline.

Look at that | Silhouette Photography

Lock at that...

Lock at that…

Lock at that...

Lock at that…

I really like using silhouettes in my work and Powerpoint presentations because I think they can very quickly convey powerful ideas in a relatively neutral and unambiguous manner. I call this silhouette series “Look”

There are several ways you can create silhouettes in your photography. One way is photo editing – Adobe Photoshop ($) and Gimp (free) are two powerful programs available on the market that can help you ‘select’ the areas you wish to silhouette, or darken. With a few simple clicks of your mouse and some technical knowhow, silhouettes can be easily created for any photo after the fact. Yet, it’s also possible to create silhouettes straight out of your camera. One way to accomplish this is to position your subject in such a way that the foreground is much darker than the background. Shooting directly into the sun without any camera flash for foreground light is perhaps the easiest way to create an almost automatic silhouette, but it’s also very possible to do it with the sun off to the side, and some knowhow around camera settings (higher shutter speeds, smaller aperatures, low ISO). In any case the rule of thumb is simple; keep your foreground dark and your background bright. In this case, I used both my camera and software editing to really exaggerate the blackness of my silhouette. This photo was taken in Northern Nunavut and features my brother.

File Speed: ISO 100
Aperture: ƒ/6.3 (with polarizer)
Focal length: 70 mm
Shutter Speed: 1/320th of a second
Filter: Hoya HD Circular Polarizer, 77mm

A Polar Bear Eating | Arctic Canada Photography

Chow time

Chow time

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Polar Bear Eating-2

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Polar Bear Eating-3

Yes, these cute “little” white bears sometimes get a bit red flushed in the face after a nice meal, and not because of the wine. Taking this photo was kind of bitter sweet for me. I was really happy to see this polar bear eating, and for having found something to eat in what otherwise appears to be a expansive landscape of barren and jagged rock. Yet, at the same time, I also realized that there is life all around this big bear, and something else had to die in order for me to get this shot. So, as the story goes, such is the circle of life.

My first Polar Bear encounter | Acrtic Canada Photography

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Polar Bears-7

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Polar Bears-6

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Polar Bears-5

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Polar Bears-4

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Polar Bears-3

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Polar Bears-2

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Polar Bears

The Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) may be the world’s largest land carnivore, and the largest of all bears, but those facts would never deter me from giving them a loving noogie behind their white furry ears if I ever had the chance! These magnificent creatures are so amazingly cute, and surprisingly agile despite their hefty size! But, sadly, I was advised during my travels in the High Arctic that sneaking up behind a polar bear to give them a noogie was strongly not advised…LOL…and how could I ignore the finger waving warning when the males among them can grow up to 10 feet tall and weigh up to 770 kilograms, WOW!

This moment marked the first time I saw a polar bear in the flesh, and it’s official, I’ve fallen totally in love with the species, and having had the chance to photograph them in the RAW is most certainly a top 10 moment in life for me!

Botany in Arctic Canada | Flower Photography

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Arctic Botany

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Arctic Botany-2

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Arctic Botany-3

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Arctic Botany-4

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Arctic Botany-5

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Arctic Botany-6

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Arctic Botany-7

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Arctic Botany-8

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Arctic Botany-9

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Arctic Botany-10

Jeffrey Meyer Photography, Arctic Botany-11
Holy Flower Power!!! Never ever in a million billion years would I have anticipated seeing flowers growing in Canada’s High Arctic, but as sure as the sun will rise tomorrow the arctic landscape is indeed capable of nurturing flower seed!

While most of the landscape I saw was barren rock, and well above the tree line, there were intense pockets of ‘lush vegetation’ and with it photographic inspiration. I’ve always enjoyed photographing flowers, but working angles all over these guys in the High Arctic was extra special. In what I would imagine to be among the most barren and inhospitable places to live on planet earth, life finds a way to sprout and shout a flair of resiliency and colour – if only for a few weeks of the year! Damn, I really do think it’s amazingly inspirational stuff…and I don’t have enough room to showcase them all!